Volume 10 Supplement 1

IRSSD 2014 Meeting Abstracts

Open Access

The relationship between spinal and pelvic parameters in the Japanese patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

  • Kenyu Ito1,
  • Shiro Imagama1,
  • Zenya Ito1,
  • Kei Ando1,
  • Kazuyoshi Kobayashi1,
  • Junichi Ukai1,
  • Akio Muramoto1 and
  • Naoki Ishiguro1
Scoliosis201510(Suppl 1):O42

https://doi.org/10.1186/1748-7161-10-S1-O42

Published: 19 January 2015

Introduction

Several studies have shown that sagittal pelvic morphology influences the sagittal spinal morphology in normal adults. However, the relationship between pelvic and spinal parameters throughout the growth process in children is poorly defined in Japan. This study aimed to clarify the influence of pelvic parameters on spinal parameters in the Japanese children with idiopathic scoliosis.

Methods

A total of 48 consecutive patients with idiopathic scoliosis (all female, mean age 15.9 years, range 12-20 years) were recruited from a single institution. All patients underwent standing posteroanterior and lateral radiographs of the spine and pelvis with their fists overlying the ipsilateral clavicle. Pelvic incidence (PI), sacral slope (SS), and pelvic tilt (PT) were measured as the pelvic parameters. Thoracic kyphosis (TK) and lumbar lordosis (LL) were measured as the sagittal spinal parameters. We divided the patients with scoliosis into hypokyphosis thoracic (H) and normal kyphosis (N) groups.

Result

The mean angles were the Cobb angle 54.7 degrees, TK 14.0 degrees, LL 49.7 degrees, PI 46.9 degrees, SS 35.8 degrees, and PT 11.1 degrees, respectively. There was no correlation between the coronal Cobb angle and the pelvic parameters, whereas PI and TK (R=0.5), TK and LL (R=0.63), and PI and LL (R=0.7) were significantly correlated. The PI in the H group (41.4 degrees) was significantly smaller than in the N group (50.9 degrees).

Conclusion

PI, LL, TK were correlated. Whereas, Cobb angle had no influence on pelvic parameter. These results suggested that patients with a lower PI may not grow into normal thoracic kyphosis or patients with hypokyphosis may not grow into a normal PI in the Japanese scoliosis patients.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nagoya University Hospital, Graduate School of Medicine

Copyright

© Ito et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2015

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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