Volume 4 Supplement 1

5th International Conference on Conservative Management of Spinal Deformities

Open Access

Adult scoliosis and the SPINECOR® dynamic brace: some early results on efficiency

  • Louise Marcotte1, 2,
  • Charles-Hilaire Rivard2 and
  • Christine Coillard2
Scoliosis20094(Suppl 1):O56

https://doi.org/10.1186/1748-7161-4-S1-O56

Published: 15 January 2009

Background

Scoliosis offers little hope for rehabilitation in the adult population. Pain and viscerosomatic dysfunction are frequently encountered. Conventional medical care uses rigid bracing, medication and surgery for the most serious cases.

The treatment of adult scoliosis with the SpineCor® Dynamic Brace deserves more attention. This brace offers a variety of combinations to improve spinal alignment depending on the type, severity and rigidity of the curve. The main therapeutic goal of this brace is to reduce the strain on the neuromusculoskeletal system. The brace acts as a dynamic support against compressive loading on the vertebral joints while creating a corrective movement in the spine.

Methods

Seventeen adult scoliosis patients aged between 21 and 69, whose curves had a Cobb angle 18 to 78 degrees, were fitted with a SpineCor® Dynamic Brace in a Chiropractic practice in Montréal, Canada. 13 of them were actively wearing it from 10 to 70 hrs per week.

Results

Thirteen of the 8 have complete resolution of their symptoms while in brace, 3 of which had a Numerical Pain Scale (NPS) over 6/10, and 2 had never experienced any pain before or after the treatment. It is important to make note that 8 of the 13 patients were concomitantly receiving CBP® Chiropractic care.

Conclusion

These results suggest that the SpineCor® Dynamic Brace is a potential, promising conservative method for the treatment of scoliosis in the adult population. In this study, utilization of this brace improved patient pain and sense of wellbeing.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Posturetek Inc., a private Chiropractic Practice
(2)
Ste-Justine Hospital

Copyright

© Marcotte et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2009

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd.

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