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The treatment of adult scoliosis utilizing the SpineCor Dynamic Corrective Brace

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Introduction

Scoliosis and spinal deformities offer little hope for rehabilitation in the adult population. Pain and viscero-somatic dysfunction are frequently encountered, and conventional medical care uses rigid bracing, medication and surgery in the most serious cases. The treatment of adult scoliosis with The SpineCor® Dynamic Corrective Brace deserves more attention. It offers a great variety of combinations to improve spinal alignment and posture, and depending on the curve type, its severity and rigidity. The main therapeutic goal is to reduce pain and the strain on the neuromusculoskeletal system. The brace acts as a dynamic support against compressive loading on the inter-vertebral joints, while creating a corrective movement in the spine which produces neuromuscular integration.

Methods

Seventy three adult scoliosis patients, 63 females and 10 males (ages between 18 and 93 years), with Cobb angles of 15° to 93° and curves of all types and many different etiologies, were fitted with a SpineCor® Brace.

Results

Of the 65 who have actively been wearing the SpineCor® Brace between 10 to 154 hrs/week, 29 have seen complete resolution of their symptoms while in the brace, 14 of which originally had a Numerical Pain Scale (NPS) of 5/10 and over. Although the brace had little effect on the curve itself, especially in older patients, and while there has been 1 reported case of aggravation in leg radiculopathy, we found an overall 60% improvement in the pain status of these patients who have been actively wearing their brace.

Discussion

These results suggest that the SpineCor® Dynamic Corrective Brace is a promising conservative method for the treatment of scoliosis in the adult population, as it improves the pain status and wellbeing of patients.

Author information

Correspondence to L Marcotte.

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Open Access This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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Keywords

  • Pain Status
  • Cobb Angle
  • Spinal Deformity
  • Radiculopathy
  • Corrective Movement