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Scoliosis and Spinal Disorders

Open Access

Gait analysis in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis walking with Boston brace

  • Mohammad Taghi Karimi1,
  • Mahsa Kavyani1 and
  • Mohammad Reza Etemadifar2
Scoliosis20149(Suppl 1):O24

Published: 4 December 2014


Scoliosiskinematicrange of motion


Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) can affect spine mobility and gait mechanisms. In some of the related science research it is showed that the kinematic differences in the spine, pelvis and lower limb may contribute to the causation and progression of idiopathic scoliosis. Various treatment methods have being used for scoliosis, however using brace is a commonly used method in this regard. Nowadays little is known about the effects of bracing on gait biomechanics in scoliotic patients. The aim of this investigation was to identify the immediate effects of bracing on improvement of asymmetries in lower limb kinematics and pelvic and back movements during level walking in scoliotic subject.


Twenty subjects (10 healthy subjects and 10 AIS with thoracolumbar/lumbar curve) were recruited in this study. Gait analysis was assessed using a three-dimensional motion analysis and a Kistler force plate. Scoliotic patients were assessed with and without Boston brace. Spatiotemporal gait parameters and kinematic parameters of the thorax, pelvis, hip, knee and ankle joints were the parameters used in this study.


Bracing had no significant effect on body segment excursion of ankle, knee and hip joints; however pelvis and hip motions were significantly reduced in all AIS patients.


The use of orthosis seems to improve the symmetry of motion of right and left sides in hip and pelvic. However it reduces the motions of these joint in scoliotic subjects.

Authors’ Affiliations

Musculoskeletal Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical sciences, Isfahan, Iran
Orthopedic Surgery Department, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical sciences, Isfahan, Iran


© Karimi et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.