Volume 9 Supplement 1

11th International Conference on Conservative Management of Spinal Deformities - SOSORT 2014 Annual Meeting

Open Access

Educational therapy of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis treated by brace

  • Jean-Claude Bernard1,
  • Julie Deceuninck1,
  • Muriele Schneider1,
  • Laurence Moisson1,
  • Audrey Combey1,
  • Rachel Bard1,
  • Anne-Lise Nogues1,
  • Laurence Burel1,
  • Gregory Notin2 and
  • Lydie Journoud2
Scoliosis20149(Suppl 1):P1

https://doi.org/10.1186/1748-7161-9-S1-P1

Published: 4 December 2014

Introduction

Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis treated by brace assent with The Patient Educational Therapy (PET) according to the “ARS” in 2013.

Inclusion

Adolescents between 12 and 15 years old with a tolerance for younger children who are still in adolescent problematic. Evolutional scoliosis diagnosis and orthopedic treatment indication.

Objectives

Improve compliance.

Improve understanding about scoliosis and its progress.

Preserve quality of life.

Course.

Educational diagnosis during the week of brace adaptation.

PET program is shape by 5 workshop on 1 day: expression group between adolescents, around the brace, experience about daily life with the brace, physical activity with brace, expression group between parents.

Discussion

The PET objectives engage the adolescent, his parents, his physiotherapist and his physician on the conservative treatment of scoliosis and allow each of them to acquire adaptability capacities and self-care capacities. Evaluation questionnaires completed by the adolescent and his parents are in analysis.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
CMCR des Massues
(2)
Ets Lecante

Copyright

© Bernard et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2014

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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