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Fig. 8 | Scoliosis and Spinal Disorders

Fig. 8

From: Brace technology thematic series: the 3D Rigo Chêneau-type brace

Fig. 8

This figure shows the classical proximal pad. It has two differentiated components: component 1 and component 2. Component 1 is the lateral component forming part of the “three-point system” correcting the main thoracic curve. This pad pushes the proximal thoracic region left to right, acting as the proximal point of the “three-point system.” Its orientation depends basically on the observed plane of maximum deformity of the main thoracic curve. It is not so accurate like measuring the angle of the plane of maximum deformity. Scoliosis where the main thoracic curve is more oriented in the frontal plane, component 1 is oriented more in the pure sagittal plane (b). Scoliosis where the main thoracic curve is oriented in a more oblique plane to dorsal, component 1 is a little bit closed to ventral (a). Component 2 is a counter-rotation pad. Proximal region will tend to rotate to the left when the main thoracic region is over-derotated to the left. This pad stops rotation in the proximal region and help to produce a detorsional effect between the main thoracic curve and the proximal thoracic region. The orientation of this counter-rotation component when observed from the left side is perpendicular to the transversal plane of reference (c). The reason for is explained later in the text and Fig. 18. The proximal section is complemented by a ventral pad, which acts preventing the scapular anterior rotation

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