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End-growth final results of an effective conservative treatment: a retrospective case series

  • 1Email author,
  • 1,
  • 1 and
  • 1
Scoliosis20072 (Suppl 1) :S6

https://doi.org/10.1186/1748-7161-2-S1-S6

  • Published:

Keywords

  • Public Health
  • Treatment Group
  • Conservative Treatment
  • Cobb Angle
  • Retrospective Case

Objective

Few papers have reported final results of conservative treatment. The aim of this paper is to review our final results between September 2003 and December 2006.

Study design

All fifty-eight patients (17% male, 83% female) who finished their treatment in the Centre of Vigevano of our Institute were included. Mean Cobb angle at the start of treatment was 22.6 ± 10.6 degrees (see Table 1), and mean age was 13.4 ± 2.4 years. Treatment groups considered included exercises, bracing+exercises, cast+exercises. Starting Cobb degrees, by groups, were: 11–20, 21–30, 31–40, over 40 degrees (see Table 2).
Table 1

End result outcome according to treatment group

Treatment

Cobb (time 0)

End result

% worsened

%improved

Total

22.6 ± 10.9

-4.3° ± 7.1°

9%

49%

Exercises

14.0° ± 4.6

-3.4° ± 5.4°

4%

33%

Bracing+exercises

25.7° ± 8.6°

-4.5° ± 7.9°

11%

48%

Cast+exercises

39.8° ± 8.3°

-6.1° ± 7.7°

14%

40%

Table 2

End result outcome according to magnitude of Cobb angle

Cobb (time 0)

Number of patients

End result

P value

11–20°

25

-1.6° ± 6.5°

NS

21–30°

18

-7.1° ± 7.2°

<0.05

31–40°

7

-3.8° ± 6.6°

<0.05

over 40°

8

-6.0° ± 6.5°

<0.05

Results

Mean age at the end of the study was 17.9 ± 2.6 years. The differences among results according to treatment (see Table 1) were statistically significant (P < 0.001). Patients with Cobb angle over 30 degrees at the end have been 15.5% (-10.4%), and over 40 degrees 3.4% (-10.4%). One patient was referred to surgery (all others receiving surgery were referred before starting treatment).

Conclusion

Surgery can be avoided in most patients if effective conservative treatment is performed correctly and initiated with appropriate timing. Follow-up studies of patients are needed.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
ISICO (Italian Scientific Spine Institute), Via Carlo Crivelli 20, 20122 Milan, Italy

Copyright

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